Frequently Asked Questions

Registered Apprenticeship Program

General

  • As a sponsor of a Registered Apprenticeship Program, login to the Registered Apprenticeship Partners Information Data System (RAPIDS) and navigate to the “Data Sharing” tab. Update the contact name, email address, phone number, address, and click the Save button. You may enter a specific individual's contact information or general contact information.

    Note: Modifications from RAPIDS are updated on Apprenticeship.gov on the 1st and 15th of every month.

    If you prefer to have your organization removed from the Apprenticeship.gov Job and Partner Finder, view our related FAQ.

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  • Any employer, association, committee, or organization that operates a Registered Apprenticeship Program. This entity assumes the full responsibility for administration and operation of the apprenticeship program. Sponsors can be a single business or a consortium of businesses. Alternatively, the sponsor can be a workforce intermediary, such as an industry association or a labor-management organization. Community colleges and community-based organizations can also serve as sponsors of apprenticeship programs.

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  • The Apprenticeship Job Finder on Apprenticeship.gov retrieves active apprenticeship job opportunities from the National Labor Exchange (NLx)—a collection of over 2 million job openings exclusively found on corporate career websites and state job banks. View instructions on how to get your apprenticeship job opportunity included in the NLx database and on the Apprenticeship Job Finder. 

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  • Administering a Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP) is the responsibility of the sponsor. Maintaining the program is also typically the responsibility of the sponsor, although Federal, state and local offices that support economic expansion, as well as community partners, may choose to contribute funds to help reduce the sponsor’s cost.   

    Federal workforce development funds through the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) may be used to offset costs and encourage more employers to invest in RAPs, and to prepare and support workers in RAPs. Although workforce development funds are limited, employers and RAPs may be eligible to receive these funds. Actual funding decisions are made at the state and local levels.  

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  • Apprenticeship program sponsors administer and operate an apprenticeship program. To find sponsors in your area, or sponsors specialized in your desired occupation or industry, search in our Partner Finder

    The Partner Finder offers several options to find sponsors including the ability to search by need, organization name, and by state/county. When on the search by need tab, check the box labeled "I want to learn from sponsors" to view sponsors.

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  • As a sponsor of a Registered Apprenticeship Program, login to the Registered Apprenticeship Partners Information Data System (RAPIDS) and navigate to the “Data Sharing” tab. Check the box “Opt-Out of data sharing” and click the Save button.

    Note: Modifications from RAPIDS are updated on Apprenticeship.gov on the 1st and 15th of every month.

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  • A Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP) is a proven model of apprenticeship that has been validated by the Department of Labor or State Apprenticeship Agency. RAPs are known for their structure, rigor, and quality and are designed for organizations interested in receiving the DOL or state seal of approval and funding opportunities made available by DOL. 

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  • There are over 150 apprenticeship programs across the federal government that enroll nearly 1,500 apprentices spanning healthcare, financial services, transportation, and skilled trades occupations, to name a few. 

    Apprenticeship may be used within the federal pay system to both up-skill the current workforce and accelerate productivity of new hires. Using standardized training curricula, which fit readily into existing agency training programs, federal agencies can equip their employees with a comprehensive understanding of both the practical and theoretical components of mission-critical occupations. Apprentices are provided with opportunities for incremental wage increases, industry-recognized credentials, a definitive career path within the federal government.

    Learn more about apprenticeship in the U.S. federal government. 

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